Astronauts from the International Space Station captured the lunar superflower lunar eclipse of the moon on Wednesday, May 26. They circled the Earth at a speed of 17,900 miles per hour (8 kilometers per second). The space station orbits at an altitude of 400 kilometers (260 miles) and orbits Earth in about 90 minutes, which means that astronauts must have a shorter view of celestial wonders than stargazers on Earth. However, the advantage of space-based commanding heights is a perfect cloudless sky.

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Wednesday’s total lunar eclipse is the only total lunar eclipse in 2021. It is most easily observed in Pacific regions such as Australia, New Zealand, Hawaii, and Papua New Guinea, but astronomical observers in Western America and East Asia can enjoy at least some parts of it, although many observers were disappointed by the cloudy weather at its location. Astronaut Tereza Pultarova
tested reaction time with the help of Japanese virtual reality astronaut
Akihiko Hoshide as the guinea pig in the experiment to measure how reaction time changes under microgravity.
(Image source: ESA / Thomas Pesquet)

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Thursday, May 27, 2021: Japanese astronaut Akihiko Hoshide floats inside the International Space Station wearing a virtual reality headset. This is how the European Space Agency (ESA) intends to measure microgravity. The environment affects reaction time as part of the experiment. Thomas Pesquet,
Hoshide’s colleague and ESA astronaut in charge of the experiment, posted this image on Twitter on Wednesday, May 26.

According to ESA, astronauts’ perception of distance is skewed in microgravity, because people believe that perception of time and space is governed by the same neural process, and scientists want to know if perception of time is also she looks affected. In the past, astronauts reacted to prompts on the laptop screen, but Pesquet explained in a recent tweet that virtual reality headsets can more effectively protect other visual impulses, resulting in more accurate data.

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