Arthur’s Stone is one of the most important prehistoric monuments, but until now few people have studied it. That is why scientists decided to finally tackle this mystery and solve it.
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A group of archaeologists and volunteers from the University of Manchester have begun the first-ever excavation to reveal the secrets of Arthur’s Stone, a 5,000-year-old tomb in Herefordshire associated with the legendary King Arthur, News Artnet writes.

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Interestingly, the tomb has never been excavated before.

“Arthur’s Stone is one of the most important prehistoric monuments, but until now it has been studied by few people. Our work is aimed at returning it to its rightful place in the history of Neolithic Britain,” said Julian Thomas, a scientist from the University of Manchester.

Professor Kate Rae of Cardiff University is co-directing the excavation with Thomas, with the assistance of students from Cardiff and some American institutes. The team carefully clears the area to find and study important archaeological remains.

Arthur’s Stone resembles similar tombs across the region, where archaeologists have found incomplete skeletons of several people, as well as flint knives, arrowheads and pottery.
Arthur’s stone, grass, sky, photo
Arthur’s Stone resembles similar tombs throughout the region, where archaeologists have found incomplete skeletons of several people

“Like many prehistoric sites in the west of England and Wales, this tomb has been associated with King Arthur as far back as the 13th century. According to legend, it was in Herefordshire that Arthur killed a giant who, when he fell, left the imprint of his elbow on one of stones,” the scientists noted.

However, historians are still not sure whether Arthur was a real person or just a myth. It’s also hard to say for sure what Arthur’s Stone looked like in its heyday. Only the inner chamber, built of nine vertical stones, topped with a giant keystone weighing 25 tons, has survived.

According to scientists, Arthur’s stone originally extended to the southwest of the field and may have been in the form of a low mound with rounded ends.

“Despite the fact that the probability is small, there is always a chance that we will be able to find the missing link to confirm the true identity of King Arthur. That is why we have all gathered here,” the experts emphasized.

Arthur’s Stone is one of the most significant Stone Age monuments in Great Britain and this excavation provides a truly rare and exciting opportunity for members of the public to see archeology in action.

We will remind that earlier archaeologists found out what the famous archaeological monument Stonehenge was still used for. As it turned out, the monument was used not only as a solar calendar. Previously, Stonehenge also served as a cemetery, where representatives of the royal family were buried.

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