This week, Queen Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom visited the home of the Spire Earth imaging company in Glasgow and witnessed the benefits of satellite data in combating climate change.
According to a statement released by Spire, this visit took place during a series of activities by the Queen in Scotland and saw the Queen and her daughter Princess Anne together. The two had a conversation with Joel Spark, Spire’s vice president of space engineering and services, to learn how data from Spire’s more than 110 satellite constellations can help governments and businesses address some of today’s biggest challenges.

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“It is an honor to welcome Her Majesty the Queen and Her Royal Highness where we can demonstrate the benefits of our technology and how to use these cutting-edge features to better understand our understanding of the world,” Spark said in a statement. . “At a critical time on our planet, continued technological advance is needed to address the imminent threats posed by climate change.”
Related: NASA to Design “Earth System Observatory” to Respond to Climate Change Understand the benefits of satellite data in addressing climate change.
During her visit to Spire, the Queen learned of the benefits of satellite data in combating climate change. (Image source: Spire Global)
Queen and Princess also visited Spire’s satellite manufacturing facility in Glasgow. Photos from this trip show Queen Elizabeth II looking closely at a Spire satellite in a display case.
The journey to Queen’s Spire is not your first taste of space exploration. The monarch recalled the impact of NASA’s Apollo 11 moon landing on her 2019 Christmas address and sent messages to astronauts in space (UK and Canada). He also visited NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Maryland and spoke with astronauts on the International Space Station in the agency’s mission control room at the Johnson Space Center in Houston.
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San Francisco-based Spire opened its Glasgow base in 2015 and recently announced plans to move from its existing 11,000-square-foot site to a larger site Also in Glasgow’s The 29,500-square-foot venue’s Skypark, according to the release.
The British government has been investing heavily in the development of Scotland’s aerospace industry, aiming to increase its value to US $ 5.5 billion (£ 4 billion) by 2030. According to Scottish Development International, Glasgow manufactures more satellites from the United States than anywhere else in the world. Companies such as the ACC Clyde Space cube satellite manufacturer and Alba Orbital are located in the city. Scotland also played an important role in Britain’s ambition to launch satellites from domestic soil into orbit, with sites in the northern Sutherland and Shetland Islands, hoping to see rockets start flying in 2022.

 

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